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The Learning Tree

The branches of our Learning Tree represent our eight areas of development.
Click the numbers to learn more about each area:

1
2
3
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5
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8
  • 1.

    1.
    Practical Life

    If teaching is to be effectve with young children, it must assist them to advance on the way to independence.

    Practical life activities address a very specific desire within each child to be able to do things for themselves. Maria Montessori identified that children become frequently frustrated with attempts to complete tasks that they see going on around them every day. Therefore, her method includes specific activities for children to develop the skills required to participate fully in the world around them. Examples of practical life activities include washing, polishing, hanging up clothes, opening and closing buttons and many more. These activities allow the child to become progressively more independent and to take pleasure in their accomplishments.

  • 1.

    1.
    Practical Life

    If teaching is to be effectve with young children, it must assist them to advance on the way to independence.

    Practical life activities address a very specific desire within each child to be able to do things for themselves. Maria Montessori identified that children become frequently frustrated with attempts to complete tasks that they see going on around them every day. Therefore, her method includes specific activities for children to develop the skills required to participate fully in the world around them. Examples of practical life activities include washing, polishing, hanging up clothes, opening and closing buttons and many more. These activities allow the child to become progressively more independent and to take pleasure in their accomplishments.

  • 2.

    2.
    Sensorial

    The senses, being explorers of the world, open the way to knowledge.

    Montessori believed that it is only through sensorial experiences that the child is able to study and slowly understand their environment. The purpose of sensorial development is to help each child to organise the variety of impressions they received every day through their five senses and thus make classifications of their environment. The sensorial materials aim to help children to comprehend differences in visuals (eg. size, colour shapes), physical touch (eg. rough, smooth, hard, soft), smell (eg. strong, mild, floral), taste (eg. sweet, sour, bitter) and various sounds. A range of carefully designed activities form the basis of our sensorial materials.

  • 3.

    3.
    Language

    Reading and writing are quite distinct from a knowledge of the letters of the alphabet.

    The development of language begins with simple sounds and the understanding that everything has its own name, and later progresses to abilities of writing, reading and enhanced communication. Learning these crucial skills does not arise from being able to recite the alphabet, but the child must first make a connection with each sound and each letter. Materials, like our sandpaper letters help children understand the shapes and curves of each letter, while other materials such as the cylinder blocks have handles designed to set the foundations for how a pen should be held.

  • 4.

    4.
    Mathematics

    In our tiny children the evidence of a mathematical bent shows itself in many striking and spontaneous ways.

    Montessori described children as having a “mathematical mind” arising from the observation that children relish precise information about the world around them and have a natural tendency towards categorisation. While mathematics and arithmetic are often thought of as difficult subjects, the Montessori philosophy suggests that children have a natural inclination towards these concepts. Mathematics and logic are essential in all aspects of life and we encourage the development of these concepts through a variety of materials and activities.

  • 5.

    5.
    Art & Design

    We do not give lessons in drawing or in modelling, and yet many of our children know how to draw flowers, birds, landscapes, and even imaginary scenes in an admirable way.

    While the Montessori philosophy does not explicitly teach children art or design, these areas are naturally enhanced by the principle that a child’s hand is a powerful means of communication. At Learners Montessori Nurseries we further expand on this by providing a range of well prepared activities to enable the children to explore their creativity and express themselves through art as well as language. As is encouraged in the EYFS syllabus, messy play activities are not only fun for children, but aid their development and sensorial stimulation.

  • 6.

    6.
    Music

    His environment must be such that it can arouse in him a feeling for, and an understanding of, music.

    Montessori believed that children are particularly sensitive to music during their “sensitive period”, typically between the ages of 2 and 6. It is therefore essential that they are exposed to music at this age to enhance their brain growth and development. We provide age-appropriate activities within the learning environment to allow children to develop their skills and reach their inherent musical potential.

  • 7.

    7.
    Physical

    Only through freedom and environmental experience is it practically possible for human development to occur.

    Physical activities help the child to refine and develop their fine and gross motor skills, as well as building their confidence, co-ordination and independence. Some of these activities may also be included in the practical life category (eg. sweeping the floor) whilst our playgrounds offer more physical sporting opportunities. Regular walks to local parks in the area as well as frequent outdoor playtimes in our prepared garden areas provide our children with the opportunity to develop their physical skills as well as build on social and emotional development through interaction with the other children.

  • 8.

    8.
    Understanding the World

    Children have an anxious concern for living beings, and the satisfaction of this instinct fills them with delight. It is therefore easy to interest them in taking care of plants and especially of animals.

    Some Montessorians may also call this category “cultural studies”, however the aim is the same - to provide the child with an understanding of the world around them. This area includes concepts of nature, geography, biology, history and science. This area will often involve activities staff have prepared especially for the child’s specific interest; if a child has a special interest in space for example, the teacher will endeavour to provide the child with suitable activities to encourage and aid learning in this subject.

Our Learners Nurseries

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